Save Us All From The Idiots Online


I wanted to respond to this article:http://www.nten.org/blog/2010/04/28/social-media-and-privacy-best-practices-managing-your-personal-and-professional-identities – but I wasn’t allowed to exceed 3000 characters, which is stupid. Do people not want good responses to good articles? Ho-hum… for anyone that wants to read it:

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Good article. Things like this make me think about the speed of change we’re having to adapt to these days.

Those of us that jump in with both feet, make a mess, discover the flaws and shape up accordingly and then there’s those of us that treat the whole thing like a big party, getting drunk, showing off, and acting like idiots just because we’re sat in front of a computer monitor at the time of writing/uploading.

These dumb-asses will continually screw up, they’ll have loose opinions, flex the truths, interpret situations badly and listen to idle gossip and spread it like gospel. For those people, I’m giggling all the way to Starbucks. In your example, imo, Brian is better off without Lindsay in the company. Social Spaces: 1 – Stupid Employee’s: 0. Lets hope Lindsay learnt from her mistakes hey?

Then there’s the managers and employers – some are daft enough to base an employment/career decision on some ill thought out tweets and facebook photos, and some are smart enough to realise that people are people and from time to time will make mistakes and conduct themselves inappropriately occasionally. Now obviously depending on the scale of the balls-up and whether it is a personal attack etc, will depend on the severity of the situation, and i’ll agree with any disciplinary needed. But on the whole, if an employee is good at what they do, has a valued skillset in the company, the appropriate (disciplinary) action (or not) should be rationally applied to reflect the severity.

Basically the real world scenario still applies.

Anyone, anywhere bad mouthing a person, people or a company, inside or outside of a company, and is overheard by someone also working for that company or is an associate of that discussed person – deserves knocking down a peg or two. Is that so bad? Sure people should be advised to consider their data online, and what consequences it may have on people, persons or companies, but I’m afraid I’m not very sympathetic towards anyone that need the (admittedly subjective) obvious pointed out to them.

In my (day)dream world, employers will relax about online information, be able to sift through the daftness and focus on the good qualities and be able to see who is worth their online weight or not. And individuals, will perhaps curtail their offline activities to consider that ‘that-thing’ that they do at parties for a laugh, might not be that funny any more now that everyone has a camera phone and a mechanism to distribute the media quickly.

It’s certainly made me think about how I behave in public and consider doing the right thing all the time, rather than getting off-my-face and not caring about my image, and other peoples thoughts and feelings.

Maybe my utopian daydream is still a long way off, and i’m no-where near perfect either, but I’m at least prepared and versed enough online to get a big apology out there quickly, just in case.

The moral of this story? It’s all Karma kids, look out, or it could come back to bite you!

Once again, nice post. I enjoyed thinking about it πŸ™‚

Mark

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One thought on “Save Us All From The Idiots Online

  1. Thanks for making us look more closely at our commenting software settings. 10,000 characters is now the upper limit for comments on NTEN.org — and as high as we can go. (But if you need more than 2,000 words, a blog’s probably not the ideal venue, anyway πŸ™‚

    So, post away. And thanks for participating in the conversation.

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