film photography


I’m wondering if I’ll ever get back in to film photography again. I have a fridge full of film, and a cupboard full of cameras… yet no inclination to shoot with them, no desire to pay the processing costs and no scanner to convert prints.

I’m the only one with the answers to whether I’ll get back into it again, yet not even I can answer my own question. So how long will I have to hold on to all this gear in order to find out?? decades? If I get rid of it all, will I regret it big time? … the cameras I have aren’t common, then again is any film camera common now? I doubt.

I’m sure there’s many like me out there too. Hanging on to that old gear, just incase the digital kit dies on us, so we’ll have a back up. But does it ever die? not really…. its pretty bloody robust isn’t it?

I guess its the sentimental attachment to mechanical gear that I might be hanging on to. Its a total bloke thing. Chunky technology that whirrs and clicks with a solid feel… weighty and solid. Its like wandering about with a piece of Ford Escort in your pocket.

So, I dunno. I guess it’ll all just sit their gathering dust… forgotten about for another half decade when I start thinking about it again… only then there will be even less chance of me ever getting back into it.

The thing is tho… like most photographers will tell you.. I actually prefer film to digital, am deluded and living in cloud cookoo land.

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5 thoughts on “film photography

  1. Ahhhhhhh Mark, quite the dilemma. Maybe you are just worn out? tired? (I hesitate to say lazy) I have a couple of digital cameras-I find it hard to respect them. There is something very satisfying about the taking of a fine film photograph. Despite what anyone says digital images will never match film images, and I don’t mean resolution. I’m talking about that wonderful “film” like look-the smile on your face as you check out that print. Dropping the neg on your scanner and digitizing that baby for posting on Flikr. ohhhhhhhh yessssssssssss. Take a swig of Geritol and have at it man!

  2. yeah I agree. effort in equals effort out. however how does one feed the urge to be motivated again?

    btw – your flickr link doesn’t work. please drop it in here and I’ll edit it into the above comment.

  3. I recently had a ‘life purge’ and got rid of probably 2/3rds of what I own but my cameras and 35mm films didn’t go…

    I actually pulled out my lomo and it sits in my bag ready to ‘shoot from the hip’ – I think it’s about a groove… just gotta get back into it. Let’s be honest, even though the results are better and more unpredictable on these guys, the importance is the process… for me at least.

    I got to get back my ‘lomo eyes and groove’!

    DK

    PS fancy an old school lomo-walk to scare some M&S security guard?

  4. Hmmmmm…the urge to be motivated. That’s tough. Not something you can push to hard, but not good to just do nuthin’ either. What interests you? Take pictures of those things. Doesn’t matter what it is. Get up early and force yourself to go out-camera in hand and just start looking at everything…people, light, objects. One of the best photographers I have seen-David Vestal, once said we shouldn’t take pictures to please everyone-take pictures to please yourself. Try to rediscover the artist in yourself. Me personally, I’m a people watcher…always have been. For me it’s easy…millions of people…millions of stories. Each face tells another story. On any given day in Chicago I have an inexhaustable supply of subjects.
    Here’s that link by the way: http://www.flickr.com/photos/8523002@N04/

  5. It came to me after my post-you are right when you say it’s a sentimental thing-hanging onto that camera gear. That’s not so bad, is it? I prefer to do things the old fashioned way-technology is a trap. Digital cameras won’t last longer…on the contrary. Every year the manufacturers come out with a supposed “improved” model. The never ending cycle of “new & improved” bah! I have two film cameras made 40 years ago that still look and operate just like they did the day they came off the assembly line. (an Olympus 35DC and a Konica Auto S2 by-the-way) Cameras made when quality mattered…when things were made to last. The lenses and mechanical parts still superior to electronic circuitry. I find something very very satisfying about that.

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